Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Maroggia’s Mill Rye loaf / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Pagnotta di segale del Mulino

Naming a Mill what’s the first thing that comes up to your mind? A loaf, of course! When thinking about home baking, the first image that pops into our mind is that of a beautifully leavened and fragrant bread. For Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook I came up with this recipe for a tasty bread homemade, using the Mill’s rye flour. I sort of thought about it as a trademark loaf! This bread goes well with local products such as salamis and cheeses, but serves as a good alternative to cereals if you enjoy a healthy, homemade breakfast, spread with a generous layer of homemade jam or a good regional honey.

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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Rye Flour Pizza/ Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Pizzette alla segale

 

Pizza, you name it…I am simply crazy about this dish! I actually think it is not by chance that my partner is 100% Neapolitan! But even before meeting him my passion for this iconic dish of the Neapolitan tradition fascinated me, and in the past 7 years I lost count of the pizzas I baked. Many of them were baked in my friend Reto’s wood fired oven, you can’t ask for more! But I realized it has been quite a while ‘since I posted a pizza dough recipe, I had to go as far as my licorice and beetroot pizza which I had baked for the MTChallenge. A gap to be filled with a new dough for Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook, made Mulino di Maroggia’s rye flour. A very tasty and versatile flour which I love particularly. I baked the pizzas blind to be garnished as one likes the best, even with cold ingredient as we are in the full bloom of summer and not anyone is in for eating an oven hot pizza!

And with this post I wish you a wonderful summertime, see you in September!
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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Semolina cheesecake/ Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Cheesecake al semolino

 

Here we are with a new recipe for Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook. As some of you might know the past year I often travelled to one of the most beautiful cities in Italy: Naples. Falling in love with a proud Neapolitan I did not miss out on the opportunity to visit the city, admiring its culture, beauty but especially enjoying its gastronomic specialties. Specialties of which time by time I have written down the names, usually using my cellphone transferring all manually on post-its when back in Chiasso. Too often these notes are then forgotten, buried by piles of books that gradually accumulate while I research for other recipes during my work of testing and programming for the baking workshops I teach at Maroggia’s Mill. Usually I and end up finding the precious notes while I clear up the mess, which I must admit happens quite infrequently, peeking out from a notebook inviting me with their phosphorescent colors to undertake a new challenge in the kitchen. So it happened with the migliaccio, a typical dessert of the Campania tradition. Hold on, before unleashing horrified comments and anathemas. This recipe has nothing to do with the traditional recipe, if not as an inspiration for this cake that I renamed semolina cheesecake. Why a cheesecake? Well this cake has a crust and the filling as the traditional dessert too requires ricotta, which makes it in itself a sweet cheesecake. Did I convince you? Well I hope so. First of all I decided to use a very fine soft wheat semolina flour, which is great for making gnocchi alla romana too, and compared to the original recipes found online I added a much lower amount of sugar. The dough, made with 00 flour, is also slightly sweetened so if you want you can add ten grams of sugar if you prefer sweeter flavors. Raisins can be soaked in rum to give the sweet an edge and nothing prevents you from adding other ingredients in the semolina filling, may it be candied fruit, nuts, chocolate or fruit it’s up to your preferences. The dessert is fresh and light and if you want to make a simpler version you can skip on lining the cake tin with pastry, but remember to grease well the mold and sprinkle it with plenty of semolina!

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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Rye Flour Tigelle / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Tigelle con farina di segale

 

Street food is now everywhere on the streets of our cities and at every special event around Ticino. A few years ago when I attended Food Immersion Festival I was impressed by Tigella Bella‘s stand but there was so much to say and eat that I realized I had completely forgot to mention them! The thought of these soft flat breads didn’t leave me but only now I had the idea to reinterpret the original recipe for Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook. The result? Spectacular! Try them as soon as baked. Warm, soft and fragrant they lend themselves beautifully for a brunch in your backyard!
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Maroggia’s Mill Cookboo: Sumac Ladyfingers / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Savoiardi al sumac

 

And we are baking sweets treats all over again at Maroggia’s Mill. For today’s Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook recipe I propose a classic of Italian pastry…slightly modified. Ladyfingers. Who hasn’t got memories of ladyfingers being stocked, packet loads of them, in the pantry? They were always there, ready for mummy to whip up a good old trifle or a tiramisu. I loved to steal a couple while she was busy preparing the chosen dessert. I loved their soft and yielding consistency and slightly spongy inside. Dipped in tea, but very quickly in order not to run the risk of turning the liquid into a cloudy porridge, they reached the peak of gustative enjoyment. Here is a whole new version flavoured with sumac, a spice commonly used in the Middle East which tastes a bit like lemon. I really like it and I find that it lends itself well to both sweet and savoury dishes. These biscuits are ideal for an alternative and light tiramisu, with yogurt and red fruits or for a fresh and summery trifle.

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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Rye Flour Grissini Breadsticks / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Grissini alla farina di segale

 

Rye flour, you name it I’ve baked it! Or have I? Well so far for Maroggia’s Mill CookbookI baked an orange and thymian cake, gluttonous vegan cookies, blinis and many other recipes. But I forgot about grissini! Here then the recipe for Maroggia’s Mill rye grissinis! Crispy and fragrant… try out rolling the dough in cornmeal or breadcrumbs to make them more crunchy and irresistible. Continue reading / Continua a leggere…

Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Banitsa / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Banitsa

It’s been more than six months, but it seems like a century ago. In June we went on a short trip to Sofia, Bulgaria. A strange city, which I feel I still have to visit in order to fully understand (or at least try to understand). Needless to say that in 4 days we ate plenty of local food. I must say that variety is not a hallmark of Bulgarian cuisine and that in our daily trip to the bakery we often opted for a warm banitsa, a bread stuffed with eggs and feta. As is well explained in this Wikipedia page banitsa is generally served with boza. For your own sake I do not recommend trying this drink.
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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Rye and Herb Ciabatta / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Ciabattine alla segale e erbe aromatiche

Ciabatta. A versatile crunchy bread roll. Breakfast? You can have ciabatta spread with butter and jam. Lunch break? Bite into a cheese and lettuce ciabatta. Snack? A mini ciabatta with a piece of chocolate will ease those hunger pangs. Dinner? Ciabatta is the perfect accompaniment for any soup, or a valuable help to scoop spaghetti sauce from the plate. For today’s recipe for Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook I flavoured the dough with fresh herbs. What a flavour! And what a pleasure to eat them with a little soft goat cheese. Maroggia’s Mill’s farina bianca nostrana is the perfect choice for this highly hydrated dough, developing a good gluten bond which traps all the air bubbles who make this ciabattas so soft. But in order to bite in those crunchy rolls you have to pull your sleeves up! Let’s get started!
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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Semlor / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Semlor

The carnival is almost over, but in Ticino opportunities to celebrate do not lack. For this post for Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook I propose a typical Shrove Tuesday recipe, from Sweden. No one will notice, we are still having fun after all aren’t we? In fact even in Sweden these soft rolls, flavoured with cardamom and filled with almond paste and cream, have become the national breakfast cake and snack and are sold in bakeries all over the country. And there’s no wondering why, they are simply irresistible!
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Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook: Taralli ‘nzogna e pepe / Il Ricettario del Mulino di Maroggia: Taralli ‘nzogna e pepe

In July I spent a couple of days in Naples. In July I fell in love. In love with a city that sings, that sings with the chattering of its inhabitants and with the rumbling and rattling noises of motorcycles. In love with the flowers, even the plastic ones, that adorn balconies, windows, terraces. In love with its food, which I did not miss to admire, to bite into, to savour. For this recipe for Maroggia’s Mill Cookbook I bake a Neapolitan classic: the ‘nzogna and pepper tarallo. Tarallari stands are located at every corner of the street and the taralli are served warm. It is impossible to resist their call. Crispy, crunchy and tasty. Heavenly. My partner, who is Neapolitan, tried and approved my recipe. Serve them as an aperitif and conquer your hosts, I assure you they won’t be disappointed!
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